“Its Like Diving Into Another World.”

~ Dick Termes

Imagine that you are standing inside a transparent ball suspended fifty feet above the Grand Canyon floor. You are higher than some canyon walls and lower than others. You have paints and a brush, and you begin to paint what you see on the inside surface of the ball. You paint the north face, then the east, south, and west. Finally, you paint everything visible above and below you. You move your globe to safe ground and step out to observe your paintings.
Walking around the sphere, you see that you have captured the entire three dimensional landscape. In fact, you’ve discovered the structure of your visual experience.

Dick acknowledges strong influences by M.C. Escher and Buckminster Fuller and has received high critical acclaim from aficionados of both camps. Termespheres are part of many prestigious collections.

This completely unique, holistic way of seeing, painting, and thinking is the key to appreciate the work of Dick Termes. In the past 32 years, Dick has explored over 160 spherical surfaces.

“Termespheres” hang in space and, powered by electric motors, rotate on a central axis. In effect, they push the old medium of two dimensional painting to a new four dimensional limit. (Time and motion are the fourth dimension.)

Pictured on this page and the one facing, are six aspects of a single Termesphere. The painting, entitled Pieces of the Whole, is self-referential in subject matter and could be considered a space/time self-portrait of, if not the artist himself, at least his thought processes as they regard perspective. Each of the five artists is working on a flat surface, rendering a portion of his surrealistic environment. Each employs a different number of vanishing points. In the North aspect we see 5 point perspective; in the East, 1 point; the South, 4 and 2; greater portion of the total environment can be drawn-hence the title, Pieces of the Whole. The seated figure in the South is pondering whether the sphere may be a way to render the whole environment as it truly is.

And this is the approach that Termes pursues. Each sphere is a revolving three-dimensional space/time exploration of an entirely closed universe. The paintings are not collages or collections of diverse images, or as some say “six paintings in one”, as much as they are complete holistic visions of highly structured environments. Full viewer participation is only possible if one mentally enters the structure and becomes immersed in it. One finds that the works from the “inside” are sometimes not what they seemed from the “outside”.